What section should we do next in Everyday Economics?

Would we be better off with more "Open" immigration?

Should the United states as a rule push for more closed borders where people cant come in to find work? Or, are we better off with an open system where by people can enter the country and find a job.

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    Anonymous shared this idea  ·   ·  Admin →

    3 comments

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      • OBloodyHell commented  · 

        A common refrain is "How is today's immigration any different from others of the past?"

        Well, I'd like to show you a very visible example of that:

        =========================================================================
        http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2009/03/10/us/20090310-immigration-explorer.html?_r=0
        =========================================================================
        Click on the link.
        Run the Slider back to 1880
        In the pulldown at left, select a country -- say, "Italy"
        Now advance the slider decade by decade, noting the manner of the bubbles that appear -- which are <b>proportional to the local, intrinsic population vs the size of the immigration</b>.

        Run the Slider back to 1880 again
        In the pulldown at left, select a country -- say, "Poland"
        Now, again, advance the slider decade by decade, noting the manner of the bubbles that appear

        Run the Slider back to 1880 again
        In the pulldown at left, select a country -- say, "Sweden" (I've picked demos with a large, over-time influx of people to this nation)
        Now, again, advance the slider decade by decade, noting the manner of the bubbles that appear

        Note the overall size of the bubbles, and see how they compare to the local population, showing the comparative influx of people to the areas into which they have gone over time.

        Run the Slider back to 1880 again
        In the pulldown at left, THIS time, let's select "Mexico"
        Now, again, advance the slider decade by decade, noting the manner of the bubbles that appear -- through 1960, it's pretty much identical to the previous "invasions" by other countries' peoples.

        Since then, it's a whole different ball of wax.

        I do ack that the article in question is from 2009, and does not include info from the 2010 Census... do you really believe it would be any different from other recent previous decades?

        <B>THIS is the problem with illegal immigration.</b> It's not that it's immigration, it's that it's an uncontrolled amount with very little "quality control" in terms of limiting blatantly unsupported elements. Prior immigrations, there was no "social safety net", you either came with a sponsor or, at the least, came and survived on your own merits. NOW you come, and if you have no merits, then you survive on the public dole, leeching off everyone else.

      • Dan commented  · 

        Open borders, where qualified and sane people can come and contribute to the economy. Politicans always seem to forget that those who live and work in this country legally contribute vastly to the economy by paying taxes, purchasing home, cars and many other things. Keep legal migration easy and allow people to enter the country on an objective education and character merit basis. Currently the U.S is totally doing it wrong by only debating about illegal immigration, and doing nothing about legal migration, which is also currently so subjective and biased. Any place that has closed doors will only live in an economic vacuum.

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